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OPEN HOUSE Saturday, November 3rd from 2-4PM
 

12180 Mellis Drive, East Cambie 

 

mellis study

Please come with any questions you may have. As always please do not hesitate to give me a call at 604.644.1044 if I can answer any questions before the open house, or if you would like to book a private showing.  In the meantime you can take a virtual tour of this gorgeous family home in East Cambie.


Alisa Sakamoto

RE/MAX Westcoast - Steveston Real Estate

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OPEN HOUSE Saturday, November 3rd from 11:30am -1:00pm 


 12438 BRUNSWICK Place, unit #16, Steveston South

 
This is the perfect opportunity to check out this fabulous Townhouse for sale in beautiful Steveston South.

brunswick 2

Please come with any questions you may have. As always please do not hesitate to give me a call at 604.644.1044 if I can answer any questions before the open house, or if you would like to book a private showing.  In the meantime you can take a virtual tour of this Steveston South Townhouse for sale.


Alisa Sakamoto

RE/MAX Westcoast - Steveston Real Estate

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When it comes time to sell your house, one of the most cost effective things you can do is paint both the inside and outside. The effort and time it takes to do this can dramatically affect a seller's sale price. 


A Little Paint Can Go A Long Way!



  

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An Alternative To Wallpaper!

 
Stumbled across this on Etsy and thought it was a fantastic idea!  Instead of dealing with the hassle of wallpaper, you can now use a roller and get the same effect.  Brilliant!


wallpaper roller

Here is an image of the finished product!  I think this looks amazing.

Etsy Wallpapered wall

If you are interested in purchasing one of these wall and paper applicators, this is where I came across it:  http://www.etsy.com/listing/109882073/wall-paper-applicator

Enjoy!
Alisa


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Buy or Sell First? 



If you are considering looking for a new house, and are a current home-owner, then chances are you’re wondering what your strategy should be:  do you wait to find the perfect new home before you put your current home on the market, or do you sell first and then look around?  You have a few options.  Use the following as a guide to explore what might be the best move for you.


keys2 

 

Sell First:

 

There are several benefits to selling your current house before searching for your next home.  First of all, once you have sold your house, you will know precisely how much money you have to work with.  With a concrete price range, you’ll be able to narrow the pool of houses before you begin looking, and negotiate accordingly.  This will allow you to immediately make firm offers on houses that you are serious about purchasing.  You can be first in line with an unconditional offer you know you can afford, and this will grant even further negotiating leverage as Sellers tend to take unconditional offers more seriously.  When they counter or turn down an offer that’s conditional on the sale of a home, they usually think the Buyer will come back with a better and more firm offer once they have sold their current home.  However, if you make an unconditional offer, the Seller will usually give you more consideration, as they realize you’re probably looking at other properties and will move on if your offer is rejected.  Likewise, if you have already sold you house, you probably do have a wider opportunity to look around, negotiate, and find the best deal and fit for you and your family.

 

The flip side of this scenario, however, is that if you don’t find the right property before the closing date of the house you’ve already sold, you may have to look for temporary housing until you do find what you’re looking for.

 

So, before you opt to sell first, you should determine whether you have alternate, temporary options, in case you have to move from your house before you’ve found a new one. How would you and your family deal with living in a transition home for an undetermined period of time?

 

 

Buy First:

 

Buying a new house without having sold your current home may occur if you are interested in a specific property and will only sell your current home if this property comes on the market.  It may be a matter of timing—grabbing hold of the home before it’s too late.  The same might be said of a property you haven’t had you eye on previously, but that catches your attention due to its uniqueness or unbelievable price.  If buying first means you don’t miss out on the real estate opportunity of a lifetime, it may be the best move.

 

However, be careful. If you buy another property and aren’t able to sell your current home quickly enough, you could end up having to finance both homes and shoulder the extra debt until you sell.  You can get a financial appraisal or market evaluation of a home prior to selling, but this doesn’t guarantee the price you’ll ultimately receive for the home after the negotiation process has run its course.  Since your selling price will be an unknown, jumping into a purchase could be a gamble, particularly if your budget is tight. 

 

Make sure you’re familiar with all aspects of the financial reality this scenario would create before you purchase another home.  You may be faced with owning two homes at once.  What type of financial stress would this bring to your life and how would you deal with it?  Consider the fact that if your current house doesn’t sell quickly enough, you may be forced to sell it off at a reduced price in order align the closing dates of your two properties.  What effect would this have on your financial situation?

 

Conditional Offer:

 

An additional option involves making your offer to purchase conditional upon the sale of your current property within a specified period.  Conditional offers usually include a clause that allows for the Sellers to keep their property on the market and remain open to other offers while you try to sell your home.  If the Sellers receive another attractive offer before you’ve sold your home, they may accept and ask you to either remove your condition and firm up your offer, or to back down from the offer.  A conditional offer forms a kind of middle ground, an area of compromise, for those who are afraid to sell or buy first—but doesn’t hold the advantages of the other two options.

 

One of the drawbacks of the conditional offer is that Sellers tend to take them less seriously.  They definitely give stronger consideration to firm offers.  This leaves you with less negotiating power.  In fact, some Sellers will simply turn down or counter a conditional offer.  Other Sellers will believe the Buyer will come back with a more serious offer when their home has sold.  So, you may end up having to increase your offer in order to have your conditional offer accepted and keep your foot in the door of your desired house. 

 

Even if your conditional offer is accepted, there is no guarantee another Buyer won’t step in and overthrow your offer before you have sold your current home, which would put you back at the starting line.  Also, consider the fact that you cannot withdraw your conditional offer until the end of the period specified in the contract—which means that if a better deal comes along, you will have to wait to jump at it.  

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I came across this photo on pinterest and thought I'd share it with you!  What a fabulous idea - putting mirrors behind lamps adds light around a room.  I love pinterest and often find a lot of great DIY or decorating ideas for your home.  
If you want, follow me: http://pinterest.com/AlisaSakamoto/




BED
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I came across this article and I thought it was very useful to share with you all especially because we are heading into the rainy fall weather.  
Have a good read!
-Alisa

Do you need a new roof? TEN ways to tell


How often do you look at your roof? If you're like me, you run in and out of the house, shuttle the kids back and forth, and glance up at the roofline only occasionally as you back out of the driveway.

 

But inspecting your roof regularly and making little fixes as needed can prevent some costly repairs down the road -- and keep those raindrops from falling on your head. There's another benefit, too: Keeping your roof in good condition will also be a big plus if you decide to sell your home.

DoTake it from the top
So, what should you look for when inspecting your roof? The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) recommends you do a roof inspection at least two times a year -- spring and fall. The best place to begin is inside your house -- grab a flashlight and make a trip to the attic.

Here are four things to look for on the inside:

    1) Places where the roof deck is sagging

    2) Signs of water damage or leaking

    3) Dark spots and trails

    4) Outside light showing through the roof.

 

Here are four things to look for on the inside:

    1) Places where the roof deck is sagging

    2) Signs of water damage or leaking

    3) Dark spots and trails

    4) Outside light showing through the roof.

 

Exterior check
When you take a look at the exterior of the roof, pay attention to such things as damaged flashing, missing shingles, curling, blistering, buckling, rotting and algae growth (which occurs most often in humid climates and appears as dark or greenish stains).

Check out these tips on what to check on the outside:

    5) Visually inspect your roof for cracked, torn, bald or missing shingles.

    6) Scan the roof for loose material or wear around chimneys, vents, pipes or other penetrations.

    7) Watch out for an excessive amount of shingle granules (they look like large grains of sand) in the gutters -- this is a sign of advanced wear.

    8) Check for signs of moisture, rot or mold. Note that wet spots may not be directly under your faulty shingle; water can travel down to its lowest spot before it drips. Mold, fungi and bacteria can grow quickly -- within 24 to 48 hours of a water-related problem.

    9) Examine the drainage, and make sure gutters and downspouts are securely attached. Also ensure all drains are open and allow water to exit, and all gutters and downspouts are free of debris.

    10) Check that all bath, kitchen and dryer vents go entirely outside of your home, not just into the attic space.

 

What's the roof made of?

  • Cedar: A cedar roof in need of repair or replacement will split and fall apart in dry climates. In moist climates, it will get mossy. The lifespan of a cedar roof is about 20 years.
  • Tile: Look for broken or cracked tiles but don't walk on the roof to do so or the tiles will break. Tile roofs can last up to 100 years, but individual tiles can break. They can be replaced, but only by a specialist.
  • Concrete: should never need replacing

If you have a roof with wooden shakes, you should also watch out for damage from termites, carpenter ants and/or other wood-boring pests.

Check the simplest solutions first
If your roof has water damage, don't jump the gun and assume you need to start all over with a brand new roof.  If your roof was properly installed and is less than than 15 to 20 years old, it can often be repaired rather than replaced.

Contact a licensed roofing contractor -- or three -- to find out what they think needs to be done and to get an estimate.

Starting over
If you do decide to go ahead and replace the whole roof, keep weather and other issues specific to your locality in mind when choosing materials.

For example, wood and asphalt shingles aren't especially fire resistant -- and this could be a problem if you live near a lot of dry brush and trees. Slate, tile and metal are more expensive materials, but they are a worthwhile investment because of the extra protection they offer against fire.

If, on the other hand, snow loads are an issue where you live, you might want to consider a durable and lightweight standing-seam metal roof. These can typically cast off the snow before it becomes a problem.

But before setting your heart on slate or tile -- and we know they look really gorgeous -- realize that these are very heavy materials. Some house framing just isn't strong enough to support the extra weight of this sort of roofing.

Start now -- before you have no choice
Don't wait until water is unexpectedly pouring into your home by way of a leaky roof. Start protecting your home by using some simple observation skills. If you find problems, it doesn't necessarily mean you need to replace your roof. Many repairs can be made before a major rebuild is necessary.

If you do need a new roof, be aware that this isn't an average "do it yourself" type of project. It's tough work -- especially if you're taking off the old roof -- and can be dangerous, too. (Roofs slope and are up high... need we say more?)

It's all looking up
Most people list "Having a roof over my head" as one of life's essentials -- and there's a reason for that. It's not just a matter of practicality or aesthetics (though both of those play a part). Your roof is what keeps you and your family safe from the sun and snow, lightning and rain.

So cozy up with the knowledge that once your roof is in tip-top shape, it will stay that way for years to come.

Source: sheknows.com HOME & GARDEN 

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Congratulations Andrew!

Mariners #20


JUST SOLD October 12th!  #20 11391 7TH Ave, Richmond

 
Rarely available 4 bedroom end unit in Steveston's highly sought after 'Mariners Village'. Unbeatable location just steps to the dyke and Garry Point Park. Only a 5 minute walk into the Village shops and both levels of schools. This unit shows beautifully in and out and features new hardwood flooring, updated kitchen and baths and a cozy new gas fireplace! Large private patio gets plenty of sun and is perfect for entertaining. Small family room off kitchen and a bonus loft area on 3rd level!


View this recently sold Townhouse or see all my home sales



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VANCOUVER, B.C. – October 2, 2012 – The summer of 2012 drew to a close in September with home sale 
activity well below historical averages in the Greater Vancouver housing market.
The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential property sales of detached, attached and apartment properties reached 1,516 in September, a 32.5 per cent decline compared to the 2,246 sales 
in September 2011 and an 8.1 per cent decline compared to the 1,649 sales in August 2012.
September sales were 41.6 per cent below the 10-year September sales average of 2,597.
 “There’s been a clear reduction in buyer demand in the three months since the federal government eliminated 
the availability of a 30-year amortization on government-insured mortgages,” Eugen Klein, REBGV president 
said. “This makes homes less affordable for the people of the region.”
New listings for detached, attached and apartment properties in Greater Vancouver totalled 5,321 in September. 
This represents a 6.3 per cent decline compared to September 2011 when 5,680 properties were listed for sale on 
the MLS® and a 31.6 per cent increase compared to the 4,044 new listings in August 2012.
At 18,350, the total number of residential property listings on the MLS® increased 14.1 per cent from this time 
last year and increased 4.5 per cent compared to August 2012.
“Today, our sales-to-active-listings ratio sits at 8 per cent, which puts us in a buyer’s market. This ratio has been 
declining in our market since March when it was 19 per cent,” Klein said.
The MLS HPI® composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Greater Vancouver is $606,100. 
This represents a decline of 0.8 per cent compared to this time last year and a decline of 2.3 per cent over last 
three months.
“Prices in the region remain relatively stable overall, although we do see some reductions in the areas that have 
had some of the largest price increases over the last year or two,” Klein said.
Sales of detached properties on the MLS® in September 2012 reached 594, a decrease of 37.9 per cent from the 
957 detached sales recorded in September 2011, and a 31.4 per cent decrease from the 866 units sold in September 2010. The benchmark price for detached properties decreased 0.5 per cent from September 2011 to $935,600.
Sales of apartment properties reached 676 in September 2012, a 26.7 per cent decrease compared to the 922 
sales in September 2011, and a decrease of 30.4 per cent compared to the 971 sales in September 2010. The 
benchmark price of an apartment property decreased 0.7 per cent from September 2011 to $368,600.
Attached property sales in September 2012 totalled 246, a 33 per cent decrease compared to the 367 sales in 
September 2011, and a 35.8 per cent decrease from the 383 attached properties sold in September 2010. The 
benchmark price of an attached unit decreased 2.7 per cent between September 2011 and 2012 to $458,600.
NEWSFLASH


Conditions continue to favour buyers in the Greater Vancouver 
housing market

  
VANCOUVER, B.C. – October 2, 2012 – The summer of 2012 drew to a close in September with home sale activity well below historical averages in the Greater Vancouver housing market.

The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential property sales of detached, attached and apartment properties reached 1,516 in September, a 32.5 per cent decline compared to the 2,246 sales in September 2011 and an 8.1 per cent decline compared to the 1,649 sales in August 2012.

September sales were 41.6 per cent below the 10-year September sales average of 2,597. 

“There’s been a clear reduction in buyer demand in the three months since the federal government eliminated the availability of a 30-year amortization on government-insured mortgages,” Eugen Klein, REBGV president said. “This makes homes less affordable for the people of the region.”

New listings for detached, attached and apartment properties in Greater Vancouver totalled 5,321 in September. This represents a 6.3 per cent decline compared to September 2011 when 5,680 properties were listed for sale on the MLS® and a 31.6 per cent increase compared to the 4,044 new listings in August 2012.

At 18,350, the total number of residential property listings on the MLS® increased 14.1 per cent from this time last year and increased 4.5 per cent compared to August 2012.

“Today, our sales-to-active-listings ratio sits at 8 per cent, which puts us in a buyer’s market. This ratio has been declining in our market since March when it was 19 per cent,” Klein said.

The MLS HPI® composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Greater Vancouver is $606,100. This represents a decline of 0.8 per cent compared to this time last year and a decline of 2.3 per cent over last three months.

“Prices in the region remain relatively stable overall, although we do see some reductions in the areas that have had some of the largest price increases over the last year or two,” Klein said.

Sales of detached properties on the MLS® in September 2012 reached 594, a decrease of 37.9 per cent from the 957 detached sales recorded in September 2011, and a 31.4 per cent decrease from the 866 units sold in September 2010. The benchmark price for detached properties decreased 0.5 per cent from September 2011 to $935,600.

Sales of apartment properties reached 676 in September 2012, a 26.7 per cent decrease compared to the 922 sales in September 2011, and a decrease of 30.4 per cent compared to the 971 sales in September 2010. The benchmark price of an apartment property decreased 0.7 per cent from September 2011 to $368,600.

Attached property sales in September 2012 totalled 246, a 33 per cent decrease compared to the 367 sales in September 2011, and a 35.8 per cent decrease from the 383 attached properties sold in September 2010. The benchmark price of an attached unit decreased 2.7 per cent between September 2011 and 2012 to $458,600.

Courtsey of the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver 
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